faraday works
A place steeped in history

Our proposals are inspired by Faraday Works’ rich history – over 150 years of innovation and industry.

We’re breathing new life into these iconic, ‘at risk’ buildings, returning the same spirit of enterprise to the site as it saw in its heyday.

1863
MADE IN CHARLTON
In 1863 Siemens Brothers boldly launched one of London’s most innovative factories, making state-of-the-art cables, before diversifying into telephones, measuring apparatus, electric lamps and bulbs.
1874
CALLING AMERICA
Siemens Brothers’ factory produced thousands of miles of subsea telegraph cables to connect the world using their own cable-laying ship, the CS Faraday – named after William Siemens’ mentor, Michael Faraday.
1880s
THE DYNAMIC TRIO
Made in Charlton, Siemens brothers dynamos and high voltage cables helped electricity spread like lightning across London and eventually the entire UK.
1881
LET THERE BE LIGHT
The Charlton factory was one of the leading manufacturers of arc lamps that were soon lighting factories, public buildings, streets and city squares. Incandescent bulbs quickly replaced arc lights, but Siemens Brothers was again at the cutting-edge.
1910
LONDON CALLING
In 1912, Siemens Brothers’ success was helped by the Uniselector, an electro-mechanical stepping switch that automatically connected calls. It sped up telephone exchanges – but reduced the need for switchboard operators.
1930
IT’S GOOD TO TALK
Launched in 1930, the Neophone was the iPhone of its day. Developed by Siemens Brothers for the Post Office, it was a big improvement on the “candlestick” telephone that could be found in many homes and businesses across the country.
1920s
BATTERIES INCLUDED
Early telephones and other devices needed batteries to work, made right here in Charlton. Siemens Brothers’ batteries were also used for radios and in cars, which then vied with horses and carts and electric trolleybuses in the busy London streets.
1944
D-DAY LANDINGS
During the Second World War, Siemens developed a top-secret cable, the ‘HAIS Cable’, for an oil pipeline across the English Channel to support the Allied invasion of Normandy in 1944. The project was known as Operation PLUTO (Pipe-Lines Under the Ocean).
1968
LIFE AFTER SIEMENS
In 1968, the board of directors made the decision to close the Woolwich factory, rather than sacrificing any of their other factories. This dealt a devastating blow to the local community as it was the largest employer in the borough, after the closure of Woolwich Arsenal a year earlier.
THE SITE TODAY

The Faraday Works site comprises four historic buildings in the north-eastern part of the Westminster Industrial Estate in Charlton Riverside. The area was in use as the Siemens Brothers Works until the late 1960’s, and the area to the south and east remains reserved for industrial uses.

We are committed to ensuring existing neighbouring businesses can continue to operate unaffected by our proposals.